ode boutique

Window Design

MARCH Window

March 3, 2017


Photo Credit: Natalie Upton

Our MARCH window is dedicated to every one of you who is working to support and empower the people who need it the most. Over the past few months, we’ve been so inspired by our Tribe: the women and people who are standing up for what is right. We've collected photographs from Women's Marches all over the country (thank you to all the contributors!!!), and they'll be on display for the entire month, so please stop by to see all that power and beauty. Onwards and upwards!

In honor of International Women’s Day, and in solidarity with a Day Without A Women, we’re giving out red bandanas to our Tribe to wear on March 8th.


Contributing Photographers share Why I March:


NATALIE UPTON
“I want my daughters to live without the fear of not having control over their own bodies. I want my girls to see their Mother stand up for what is intrinsically “right” in this world.  I march because I want to be an active member of this global community who believes and fights for equal rights for all human beings.  Sometimes, when the battle feels too overwhelming to win from the outside, you just have to show up and see who’s standing with you.”  


ERIN LONG​
“I marched for so many reasons. I marched for all the young women in my life, who should always have a right to choices for their own bodies, I marched as a proud single mama to two incredible young men who should see and hear the strength of women, and that we are equal, I marched as a proud lesbian who someday if I meet someone, fall in love...that I will still have the same rights as straight people to marry the love of my life!” 


RYANE DELKA
"I marched because I was terrified and broken and knew that I, compared to so many others, had the least to fear, yet the fear I was experiencing was debilitating.  And because I didn't know where else to begin, I marched and was reminded of the beauty and true goodness in humanity and lifted by the coming together of such love.” 


JENESSA CINTRON
“I am a mother to a transgender child. I am a Mexican and Puerto Rican citizen. I have personally been a client at Planned Parenthood. I believe in the preservation of sacred lands and our environment. I believe in equal civil rights for all humans. I am a woman! And I feel like all of that has been under attack with the rhetoric and policies that are being pushed forward under this administration.” 


KRISTIN KELLY
“I marched because I needed a starting point for action: to physically surround myself with strong women and to move forward with them. I marched to combat the hopelessness I felt at first. I marched to show solidarity with and support for those most attacked and marginalized right now. Marching was the start of my promise to stay informed, compassionate, and active.” 



Photo credit: Natalie Upton


Photo Credit: Natalie Upton


Photo Credit: Natalie Upton


Photo Credit: Natalie Upton


Photo Credit: Natalie Upton


Photo Credit: Natalie Upton


Photo Credit: Natalie Upton


Photo Credit: Natalie Upton


Photo Credit: Natalie Upton


Photo Credit: Ryane Delka


Photo Credit: Ryane Delka


Photo Credit: Natalie Upton


Photo Credit: Erin Long


Photo Credit: Kristin Kelly


Photo Credit: Natalie Upton


Photo Credit: Kristin Kelly


Photo Credit: Jenessa Cintron


Photo Credit: Jenessa Cintron


Photo Credit: Kristin Kelly


Photo Credit: Kristin Kelly


Photo Credit: Kristin Kelly


Photo Credit: Kristin Kelly


Photo Credit: Kristin Kelly


Photo Credit: Kristin Kelly


Photo Credit: Kristin Kelly

Artist Interview

Love in the Key of Kimaya Diggs

February 10, 2017



Kimaya Diggs has got heart. It's warm and welcoming, palpable and catching.  She's just the kind of person you'd want around on a rainy day.  Cellist, vocalist, guitarist, ukulele-ist, she's her own accompanist. Rings are her thing, as are the songs she sings; both of which she's been collecting and culling since a child. When she lets go in a song, her voice is acrobatic with with lilts and lifts. When she dances (she requested The Pointer Sisters at our photoshoot), it's with a goofy abandon. Kimaya Diggs, Be Our Valentine.

Ms. Diggs will be performing her love songs at Ode on Friday, Feb. 10th, from 6-8pm. Come join us and celebrate the love!

 

What sings to you?
Sunlight! There’s definitely some sunflower and some housecat in my genes, because there is nothing as life-giving to me as being in the sun.

Talk to us about Valentine’s Day.
It’s my favorite holiday--as a homeschooled youngster I never grew out of the little-kid thing where you make valentines for everyone you know. Even now I handmake valentines for my friends every year. I love getting the opportunity to tell people that I love them, and I wish there were more moments in life that facilitate the re/affirmation of love. Since there aren’t many moments like that built into our culture, I try to create or expand those spaces whenever I find one.

You’re not only a singer/musician/songwriter, but you’re also a teacher. What’s your teaching philosophy?
I was lucky enough to grow up surrounded by music and my own voice grew in a beautiful, natural setting. I have many students who didn’t have that privilege and who struggle to see their voices as extensions of their emotional and powerful selves. My teaching is rooted in my belief that singing is healing, empowering, and an essential part of community-building--and that everyone can contribute, meaningfully, with their voice.

What breaks your heart? What mends it?
Racism breaks my heart, man! Growing up in the valley not thinking about how you aren’t white, moving away, growing up, learning, seeing, coming home with a president who’s pulled the curtain up on a whole culture of repressed racism that’s just been waiting for the chance to explode is like biting into a perfect mango to find it teeming with maggots inside—

but what mends it is to sing, and it’s hard—at first it comes out shaky and weak and I want to quit right there, but my breath keeps pumping, my amazing, miraculous lungs, my lips move, my tongue slopes, my head rings and resonates and I vibrate a little more love into the air.  

 

First musical memory:
I used to accompany myself on a little drum, and I remember just wailing my heart out, feeling like I sounded just like Ella Fitzgerald, which was far from the truth.

Favorite lyric or line from a song or poem:
Every sorceress is
A pragmatist at heart; nobody sees essence who can't
Face limitation. If I wanted only to hold you

I could hold you prisoner.

— From “Circe’s Power” by Louise Gluck (from her book Meadowlands)

What makes a love song work?
I like a little melancholy. I realize more and more how lasting love is a choice, and not always an easy one. I love me a passionate new-love song, but I also like when you can tell that a love that seems whole is actually a hundred pieces taped and patched together.

 

What’s on your Valentine’s playlist?
What You Don’t Do - Lianne LaHavas
Love on Top - Beyonce
Aventurera - Natalia Lafourcade
Gatekeeper - Feist
Like a Star - Corinne Bailey Rae

How would you describe your style?
I wear lots of flowers, lots of “sweater-robes” (do those have a real name? long sweaters?), and I almost always have some sort of long wrap, like a pashmina or a kimono shawl, something like that. My body is shaped like a kebab skewer so I like to break up the line with flowy layers and loose silhouettes.

Favorite word to sing:
Woah--I’ve never thought about this. Maybe “farewell.”

What’s a perfect day with your Valentine?
Anything involving soup, haha. I love soup, especially in February. Other than that, giving valentines to our friends, giggling excitedly about this being our last v-day before we get married in June, and probably watching The Mindy Project.



[CHATTMAN PHOTOGRAPHY]

Artist Interview

Hand to Home: Kim Rosen & Cara Taylor

November 10, 2016

                              Ceramics by Cara Taylor  |   Embroidered leather and pillow by Kim Rosen

Art is a medium that not only provides the world with beauty, but also with hope. It speaks to that thing deep inside us (the heart, the soul, the spirit) that makes us human. From darker periods, art flourishes. Today feels like a time when we really need our artists and their art. That is why we are so excited to bring Kim Rosen of FAYCE Textiles and Cara Taylor of Taylor Ceramics into Ode on Friday, November 11th, 6-8pm. Come join us, and we'll celebrate beauty and art and the women that make that possible. From their hands to our home. Meet Cara and Kim:

                                        
                                                                   CARA TAYLOR

What makes your house a home?
The first time I walked though our tiny house the space made sense to me. Kim and I saw it when it was empty and it was easy to imagine how we would fill it to create a warm and comfortable home.  For about 10 years now the house is that home I envisioned - it is filled with the artwork of our friends, handmade goods collected from our travels as well as the colors, textures and patterns that we love. They have changed over the years as we have changed but the essence of home is the same - it is place where we cook and eat together, spend time with friends and rest - it is quiet and tucked away but right in the heart of the community we call home too.  I am beyond grateful for my sense of home each and every day. 


                                                                   Taylor Ceramics

What’s in your cup (or bowl or vase)?
My cup is filled with coffee; my bowl with soup, and my vases will hold anything that’s in season – the garden in my yard always has something to offer, most recently big, bright pink dahlias.

                                                                   Taylor Ceramics

What’s your favorite Thanksgiving dish?
Every year I make a pie that is a family favorite and has been around for decades – I’ve never had anything like it or known anyone to make one that is similar.  It’s made with marshmallows and bittersweet chocolate with a graham cracker crust. I don’t want to say more because it’s kind of a secret. It doesn’t feel like Thanksgiving without at least one slice.

       
                                      Ode/FAYCE/Taylor Ceramics collaboration, in the works!

How do you decorate or get in the mood for the holidays?
I like to bake and make gifts, go to holiday parties… I don’t do much decorating but I do like a good wreath on the door and the Yule log crackling on TV.

                                          
                                                                         KIM ROSEN         

What makes your house a home?
Our home is filled with pieces that were either made by or inherited from friends and loved ones. Being surrounded by meaningful and precious things, to me, makes our house a home. And of course, Cara is the most important part of home for me.


                                                                     FAYCE Textiles                           

What’s in your cup?
Coffee or hot water.

What’s your favorite Thanksgiving dish?
Cranberry sauce and spoon bread.


                                                                     FAYCE Textiles            

Best gift you ever received or gave?
A surprise weekend getaway in the mountains with my nearest and dearest.

What inspires your designs?
I am inspired by vintage textiles, architectural details, patterns found in nature and the juxtaposition of modern and rustic and old and new.


                                                                     FAYCE Textiles            

How do you decorate or get in the mood for the holidays?
In lieu of an actual fireplace, we often put the yule log on the tv and it sets the tone immediately. I also up my cookie and candy intake quite a bit.

Any magical or memorable moments of 2016?
Everyday that I get to create pieces with the possibility that they could make someone's house a home is basically magic to me. 

Artist Interview

Georgia Rae

October 14, 2016



When you've got a name like Georgia Rae, you can't not be cool. Musician, photographer, pug-owner, and song-writer, we think Georgia (aka "Gigi") has it covered. Equal parts grit and grace, Gigi is the epitome of cool. She's a dress-and-sneakers kind of girl with an old soul vibe. Midway through our Ode photoshoot, she tuned a borrowed guitar in a clearing in the Montague Sandplains and played a song she'd written about chains and meadows and skies and memories. It's the kind of song that sticks with you. Come hear Georgia Rae perform at Ode Friday, October 14th, 6-8pm. We'll be sipping cider and celebrating the Fall.

  

What song sounds like Fall to you?
Nico’s “These Days” definitely conjures a certain autumnal feeling for me. Also, maybe more obviously, the Mamas and the Papas’ “California Dreamin”.

Tell us about your pug. 
I found Helo in L.A. in the summer of 2012 at a rescue out of a journalist/animal-lover’s cottage in the suburbs. I had been looking for a pug for a while, and knew I wanted to rescue one. I was heading to L.A. on a cross-country trip and realized while in Denver that I hadn’t exhausted the West Coast’s rescue resources yet. It was instant love when I walked into the cottage. As a small herd of black pug puppies ran out to greet me, Helo came trotting out behind, grinning and upright. He rode all the way back across the country in the car with me, wheezing and snorting (as a pug is oft to do in the hottest days of summer). One day into the trip back, we had a nasty run-in with a junkyard dog, but it only brought us closer. Today he’s seven years old and still enjoys short walks, long car rides, and anything remotely edible.

 

Best musical performance you’ve ever seen?
I’ve seen so many great shows in basements, rock halls and larger venues, but if I were to choose one within this year, I’d have to say seeing Wilco at Mountain Jam was pretty insane. It was one of those pinch-me moments where I couldn’t believe I was finally seeing the band I’ve sung to.

When you record your first album (soon, please!), what do imagine on the cover?
I actually did write and record an album in high school for my senior project with a slew of great local musicians including June Millington, Jim Armeni, and Penny Schultz. I recorded it with June at the Institute for the Musical Arts in Goshen. Because I was a 17-year-old girl, I naturally chose to have my face by the cover. I’d rethink that method now. I think for my next album, which would no doubt be with a full band, would have a cover that invoices whatever imagery is around me when we record it. Whether that’s a photograph, or a collage, or a drawing from a friend is very much in the air.

Describe your style. Any favorite pieces you like wearing during sweater weather?
My style is a little random, and entirely dependent on the season, weather, and my mood. Sometimes, a simple t-shirt, jeans, and trucker hat with Converse, and other times, I go all out. Whatever I wear, though, it’s always for me. In sweater weather, I typically like to wear big, wrap-around scarves and tall boots and/or leg warmers, for their practicality and look. And chunky sweaters. I’m pretty much always kind of trying to look like Katniss in District 12.

Along with being a musician, you’re a photographer too. What's your favorite photograph you’ve taken? 
My aim is to capture real moments with people. I also love taking pictures of animals. Some of my favorite photographers include Dave Heath, Sara Saudkova, Man Ray, and Jason Houston.

 

What’s on your most played list?
Whitney’s new album, "Light Upon the Lake", has me completely captured.

And lastly, a very important question: what are you going to be for Halloween?
Princess Buttercup (if I can find the dress in time) or a fox are the current ideas. But I usually have a costume plan, then seconds before going out Halloween night, I scramble to find something else ‘cause my current costume has become boring to me.




                  Chattman Photography    |    Makeup by Jenessa    |    Styling by Kristin / Ode

Artist Interview

ART BAR with Thea Price-Eckles

September 7, 2016


Thea Price-Eckles will be mixing her signature cocktails and selling her handmade home goods 
                                              Friday, September 9th, 6-8pm at Ode. 


Meet Thea Price-Eckles: woodworker, wordsmith, and mixologist. Beverage manager and creative partner at Brassica, a French/American style restaurant in Jamaica Plains, Thea is the thinker behind the "thoughtful cocktail". When she's not muddling locally sourced drinks (we hear she has quite an herb garden), she's in her workshop hand-carving homegoods or building furniture from scratch. When she has a rare spare moment, you may find Thea planning her next solo-adventure, this time to Morocco. Or she's reading Syliva Plath. Or riding a motorbike through the woods. Or teaching us a thing or two about a thing or two. You need to read this interview!

  

Perfect fall cocktail…how do we make it? 
Fall, my favorite season for one reason aside from boots: it just seems more appropriate to drink stirred brown drinks in Fall than it does in summer, which suits me because my palette definetely prefers spirit forward stirred drinks rather than the fruity refreshing drinks of summer. I would make an Apple Brandy Oaxacan Old Fashioned, recipe below:

1.5 oz Apple Brandy (Lairds Bonded Applejack, if you can find it)
1.5 oz Mezcal
.5 oz maple syrup
2 dashes Orange Bitters
1 dash Angostura bitters
1 dash Jerry Thomas Bitters
Fresh Orange peel

Stir all ingredients except orange peel until well chilled, and strain over a king cube or into a chilled
glass—garnish with orange peel by bending the peel to get all the oils out. Wrap a cozy scarf around your shoulders and sip slowly.

Your cat's name is Breakfast and your dog’s name is Portabella. What would  you name a pet horse? 
It is in my grand life scheme to have horses! Who knows what I'll actually name it, but right now, I'd name my horse Mirepoix. 

Describe your current style, including influences or inspirations 
(and  the names of the lipstick you’ve been donning).  
I would describe my current style as "chameleon", but I'm usually going down one of two roads. Fork in the road A: Getting things done look, incidentally inspired by Lara Croft. Boots, shorts, braided pony tail, black tank top, denim jacket, K/ller necklace, tape measure, and utility knife. Burgundy lipstick (Obsessive Compulsive cosmetics Lip Tar in Black Dahlia—yes I wear lipstick in the woodshop). Fork in the road B: I got a day off and I'm not going in the shop look, inspired by my grandmother Judy. Florals, a long prairie skirt, crop top, platforms, long necklace, bright pink lipstick (Tarte: Surfer Girl. It's amazing). 

What’s in your perfect‐picnic basket. Where and with whom do you go, and what do you wear?
Pic-nic basket: A pint of Fomu coconut ice cream, 2 spoons, a flask full of negronis. Where: Lars Anderson Park in Jamaica Plain, the best sunset observatory in Boston. Who: My partner in life, crime and business, Philip and our dog Portabella. Outfit: Hooded cashmere bodysuit. This doesn't exist yet, where can I get one?

   

Is art a necessity?
We don't have to declare it one for it to be, it's done that to itself. Could plants procreate without flowers? You can see necessities as art if you choose to, and I highly recommend that everyone does. 

You dabble in a lot of languages. What’s your favorite word from each of the  languages you speak.
I have a lot of favorite Arabic words, I love the sound of that language. Tu'burni is an arabic word that doesn't really have a translation in English, but it literally translates as "you bury me" and it is an expression of deep affection (the idea being that you hope you die before the person you are saying it to so you don't have to live without them). Also, Mish Mish, it means apricot, and it's a good word.  French….je ne sais pas ce que...

Give us a line from the last thing you’ve written.
"I've been trying to practice sleeping with my back to the monster. I lay on her belly up and we both rumble. She cradles me like a rock in her slingshot, my muscles rigid."

  

Favorite piece of clothing and the story behind it: 
A yellow and blue jacket that I bought from a fashion designer in Cairo. It's inspired by a traditional Egyptain jacket and is a beautiful yellow with blue collar and cuffs. It has a drawstring around the waist band and it's just so unique and flattering and versatile. I feel so lucky to have it. The woman I bought it from I met at a wedding, she was wearing an amazing ruffle-y silk scarf and I asked her how I could get one like it. This led to me coming to her studio to pick through her creations. I got a robe, the jacket and of course the silk scarf. All three are extremely specially to me.

What should we order at Brassica?  
Our menu changes very often with the availability of produce, but you can always come in and get a Tobacco Farm cocktail and Octopus Tagliatelle, which are my two favorite items and represent what we do very well. 

 

Wood, words, or wardrobe? 
A wooden wardrobe that exists only in words. 

CHATTMAN PHOTOGRAPHY    |    Hair and Makeup by Kiki    |   Styling by Kristin/Ode